Weltanschauung – Worldview

 

Prompted by the word for the day on my tear-off calendar, weltanschauung, and a magnetic poetry kit in German, I dove right in to compose a Haiku in German and in English. Call it playing! Hope you enjoy my attempts today.

Weltanschauung ist
einfach: Liebe, Musik und
Poesie, Natur.

My worldview is quite
simple: love, music, nature,
poetry, singing.

Note: The German word Weltanschauung literally means “world view”; it combines Welt (“world”) with Anschauung (“view”), which ultimately derives from the Middle High German verb schouwen (“to look at” or “to see”). When we first adopted it from German in the mid-19th century, weltanschauung referred to a philosophical view or apprehension of the universe, and this sense is still the most widely used. It can also describe a more general ideology or philosophy of life.

 

This entry was posted in haiku, Middle High German, Weltanschauung, word origins, word usages, worldview and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to Weltanschauung – Worldview

  1. Wonderful ways to view the world! ❤ Well done, Mary Ann!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bette, the Haiku Queen: thank you so much! I tried to keep both languages about the same. As you know, writing poetry in other languages does not always translate exactly. Enjoyed the process and inspired by your many haiku poems and photos, I tried to play today. Do you also have a blizzard warning? Stay warm and enjoy the weekend. oxox

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  2. Peter Klopp says:

    Schauen hat eine viel tiefere Bedeutung als Sehen. Deswegen hat der Begriff Weltanschauung auch einen starken philosophischen Kern, der die innere Welt der menschlichen Seele mit einbezieht. My apologies, I had to write this in German, Mary Ann! Have a great Sunday! Peter

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    • Vielen Dank, Peter, für Deinen philosophischen Kommentar. Du hast Recht. Wenn man wirklich auf das schaut, was man sieht, sind Geist, Herz und Seele involviert. Zum Beispiel sehe ich viele Autos auf der Straße, aber wenn ich sie mir anschaue, erfahre ich mehr Details. Die Kunst des Übersetzens ist kompliziert und umso mehr, wenn ich mich mit Poesie beschäftige. Es funktioniert nicht immer, genaue Bedeutungen von einer Sprache in eine andere zu übertragen. Während meines Studiums an der Uni in Heidelberg stellte ich fest, dass ich ein oder zwei Sätze brauchte, um ein deutsches Wort zu vermitteln und zu erklären. Ein gutes Beispiel könnte das deutsche Wort “Gemütlichkeit” sein, über das sich viele Übersetzer nicht einig sind. Nochmals vielen Dank, dass Du heute Philosoph bist. Sehr geschätzt. Have a wonderful weekend. “”__””

      Thank you, Peter, for your philosophical comment. You are correct. Really looking at what you are seeing involves the mind, heart and soul. For example, I see many cars on the street but looking at them tells me more details. The art of translation is complicated and even more so, when I tackle poetry. Conveying exact meanings from one language to another doesn’t always work. I discovered in my studies at the Uni in Heidelberg, Germany, that I needed one or two sentences to convey and explain one German word. A good example might be the German word “Gemütlichkeit” on which many translators are not in agreement. Thank you once again for being a philosopher today. Much appreciated.

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      • Peter Klopp says:

        To find the right translation for the German word “Gemütlichkeit” is indeed a challenge, as it contains so many different aspects of emotional wellbeing. Thank you so much for taking the time to express your thoughts on this thorny linguistic problem with traslation!

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      • Peter – thank you for the comment. Translating is not a thorny issue for me. It is a passion to find just the “right” word or words to express what the writer intended. I have done many various translations over the years. Everything from last wills and testaments, family documents in the old style handwriting in German, scientific and technical translations and probably my first and most memorable one was in Heidelberg when my professor was on vacation. I translated the US edition of the German magazine called Schöner Wohnen. Small jobs and some more complicated including in the lawyer’s office making a phone call to a relative in Germany of the deceased here in the US and then interpreting in the two languages. I don’t believe there was the capability of speaker phone at this lawyer’s office either. One of my favorite set of dictionaries is the two volume Wildhagen Heracourt which includes both American and British English usages plus some scientific words. Translating means several dictionaries at the ready(including some online), a ton of patience and lots of time. I relish the challenge. Have a great week. 🙂

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      • Peter Klopp says:

        I can truly appreciate what you were saying about your passion of translating, all the more so, since I have been struggling to translate a book written in German by my cousin Eberhard Klopp. I traslate the text in a sense of duty rather than out of passion,. My family with the exception of our oldest son have lost the German language and they and our grandchildren would never be able to read the story of their German ancestors. Have a great week!

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      • Peter, I laud you your sense of duty in translating. It will be an excellent document for posterity I am certain. Future ancestors will be able to trace their family and read more of their struggles. Where was your cousin Eberhard from in Germany? When was his book written? I think it is cool that you are doing this. Sometimes the creative block and the grind of the work interferes with completing it. That’s when it’s time to change pace, put it aside, take a walk in nature and then return to the project when you are well rested. I understand that translating can sometimes be frustrating. Bless you for this noble endeavor! Thank you for the well wishes and just take your time. When you are done, I hope it will be included in a library collection even if in microfilm for future generations. “”__””

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      • Peter Klopp says:

        My cousin Eberhard lives in Trier. He published the book in 1997 after intensive research into our family history and visiting and interviwing many family members between 1980 and 1995. Thank you for your kind words of encouragement, Mary Ann!

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      • Ah, Trier, the Rome of the North! I love that city, Peter. Best of luck and blessings for the translation work you are engaged in. Time-consuming but with great rewards. Have a good week! 🙂

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  3. Clare Pooley says:

    What a lovely Haiku and in German, too! I hope you are enjoying your weekend and aren’t too cold xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Annika Perry says:

    Mary Ann, I love the haikus and how lovely to have it in both languages! Twice the impact! I’m taken with your idea of ‘playing’ with the words until you find the perfect haiku! Funnily enough, I have just had published Oskar’s Abenteuer … the German version of my children’s book. It’s fun to work in many languages! Ahh … the flowers are glorious, a burst of joy on a grey afternoon! 😀🌺

    Liked by 1 person

    • Annika, cool idea about your book in German. Did you write that version or did someone else? You know German which is why I ask. Thank you for your great comment about twice the impact as I played in both languages. Do you have plans for your book in Swedish too? I do so enjoy the fresh cut flowers in many bright colors too. As I went out to our gardens this morning, I noticed that the daffodils must be confused by our snow and then spring weather. They have pushed up with green shoots. How exciting! Certain that our snows are not over, the daffodils may have to blossom in the snows this year! Have fun working in multiple languages, Annika. That brings great pleasure to both of us! oxox

      Liked by 1 person

      • Annika Perry says:

        Ahh … daffodils in the snow! How pretty but not ideal perhaps! Here they are in full bloom although some rather windswept and fallen over. Yes, you are quite right, the Swedish version will be out later in spring… it’s a fascinating and fun project!

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      • Annika, I am delighted to hear news of your book. Did you translate it into German? And will you in Swedish? You already have daffodils? My, my, my. No flowers for us at least for another month or two. Today we had spring weather but still have snow on the ground. We have had an odd winter.

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  5. Erica/Erika says:

    A fun post, Mary Ann. German used to be my first language and I am very rusty now. I also have often found how challenging it is to translate certain words. One example is how you and Peter discuss “Gemutlichkeit.” It is a term depicting many aspects of emotional wellbeing and difficult to translate. Wonderful haiku in German and in English.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Erica/Erika, thanks; danke. If German used to be your first language, where did you or your family originate? Glad you got the gist of translating issues. Fun and frustrating. So glad you enjoyed the haiku. Happy writing!

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      • Erica/Erika says:

        Hi Mary Ann, I was born in Vancouver although my parents spoke only German in the house. I did not ever receive a clear answer on where they lived in Europe. Possibly, because the borders continued to change. A very difficult time for them as children and they did not talk about things. I look forward to continuing to read your site.

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      • Erika, that generation did not talk much about their early lives. Since Poland was not on a map for about 100 years, it must have been quite tough to suddenly have to speak another language and to have someone else “run” the government. I have heard stories from older Germans who told me of the Soviets coming in and confiscating their property, and of having to flee for their lives. Researching families and lives can sometimes be difficult. Sometimes we have to read between the lines. May the rest of your week bring you peace. Thank you for the lovely comment.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Erica/Erika says:

        I do know how my parents were fluent in Polish and German as children, and something about knowing how to speak Polish saved their lives. Yes, fleeing for their lives. They met in Vancouver as teens. I am forever grateful how I have the good life I have because of the courage, desperation, luck, kindness of others, that brought my grandparents and parents to North America. Yes, read between the lines. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Erika, it seems we have been abundantly blessed by family members who went before us. My last name means “the German girl,” and I recall that my Polish grandmother spoke of “walking over the border and working in Germany” before she came to the US in her 20s. Until about age 10, I heard Polish spoken by relatives in Massachusetts. Then we moved to Colorado. Some words still remain which is fortunate. Thank you once more for your comments. Much appreciated. “”__””

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